The Road To Nukus

Road to Nukus

Road to Nukus

As we travel across the desert we stop at a couple of ancient forts. The archeological work was done nearly a 100 years ago, but the brick and mud structures are still evident. Most of the ‘good stuff’ has been moved out to museums – much of it we believe is in Russia. But the old structures still have their interest.
Kz’il-kala

Kz’il-kala


Kz’il-kala was initially established in the 1st- to 4th-centuries CE, but was abandoned and rebuilt in the 12th-13th-centuries on the eve of the Mongol invasions.
Toprak-kala

Toprak-kala


Toprak-kala is a larger site dated from the Kushan period, around the 2nd-3rd-centuries CE.

We also see endless cotton fields being worked by hand. We finally arrive in the small city of Nukus, home to an incredible museum with a world class collection of Russian avant garde art.

Weeding Cotton Fields

Weeding Cotton Fields

2 comments to The Road To Nukus

  • Judy Christis

    Doesn’t cotton require a lot of water to grow??

    • David Kutz

      Yes, a great deal of water is needed to grow cotton and they irrigate like crazy. In the process the Soviets conspired to created one of the world’s greatest ecological disasters. See the earlier post on the Aral Sea … and/or click here for this basic information. We have also seen fields that have a layer of salt due decades of irrigation.

      I’ve also learned that the government conscripts workers to work the cotton fields. One of the employees at the museum in Nukus — the gift shop supervisor — was on on leave to provide this work. I was also informed that it is illegal to photograph the cotton fields or the workers. Fortunately I was ignorant of that fact and there where no police insight. There are police everywhere, but not out in this baking field.

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